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Saturday, August 11, 2012

Dr. Seuss’s World War II Political Propaganda Cartoons

PUBLISHED IN: Brain Pickings 

COURTESY OF MARIA POPOVA

Mrs.D suggest you visit this amazing Brain Pickings blog!!! 



Brain Pickings is the brain child of Maria Popova, an interestingness hunter-gatherer and curious mind at large, who also writes for Wired UK andThe Atlantic, among others, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow. She gets occasional help from a handful of guest contributors.


Dr. Seuss’s World War II Political Propaganda Cartoons

By: 
“One-tenth of your income must go into War Bonds if you hope to defeat both the Axis and inflation!”
Dr. Seuss (1904-1991) may be best-remembered for his irreverent rhymes and the timeless prescriptions for livingembedded in them, but he was also a prolific maker of subversive secret artand the auteur of a naughty book for adults. Though his children’s books have already been shown to brim with subtle political propaganda, during WWII, like Walt Disney, Geisel lent his creative talents to far more explicit, adult-focused wartime propaganda when he joined the New York daily newspaper PM as a political cartoonist. Dr. Seuss Goes to War: The World War II Editorial Cartoons of Theodor Seuss Geisel (public library) collects 200 of Geisel’s black-and-white illustrations, but more than half of his editorial cartoons were never made publicly available — until now. Dr. Seuss Goes To War: A Catalog of Political Cartoons from UCSD Libraries has digitized the original drawings and newspaper clippings of Geisel’s wartime cartoons, produced between 1941 and 1943. Here’s a sampling:

We're just going to knock out the unnecessary floors designed by F.D.R., published by PM Magazine on May 18, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Insure your home against Hitler!, published by PM Magazine on July 28, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

In Russia a chap, so we're told, knits an object strange to behold. Asked what is his gag, he says 'This is the bag that the great Adolf will hold!,' published by PM Magazine on August 11, 1941, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Spreading the lovely Goebbels stuff, published by PM Magazine on September 18, 1941, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Tis Roosevelt, Not Hitler, that the world should really fear, published by PM Magazine on June 2, 1941, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Boss, maybe you'd better hock me and buy more U.S. Defense Bonds and Stamps!, published by PM Magazine on December 26, 1941, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Those Americans sure can attack... themselves!, published by PM Magazine on February 11, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego
In Dr. Seuss & Mr. Geisel: A Biography, Judith and Neil Morgan contextualize the collaboration:
Ted was haunted by the war in Europe, and one evening in Manhattan he showed an editorial cartoon he had drawn to his friend Zinny Vanderlip Schoales, the brilliant, hard-drinking intellectual…. She had joined the patrician liberal Ralph Ingersoll when he launched the tabloid newspaper PMin New York with the backing of Marshall Field III. Zinny took Ted’s cartoon to Ingersoll and PM published it on January 30, 1941…

You, Too, can sink U-Boats, published by PM Magazine on May 24, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Cages cost money!, published by PM Magazine on December 15, 1941, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Don't let them carve THOSE faces on our mountains, published by PM Magazine on December 12, 1941, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

One buck out of every 10!, published by PM Magazine on May 2, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Join the C.B.C.!, published by PM Magazine on August 4, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Me? I'd give my life for my country, published by PM Magazine on September 1, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Maybe it's none of our business... but how much are YOU giving this Christmas in U.S. War Bonds and Stamps?, published by PM Magazine on December 22, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Wipe that sneer off his face!, published by PM Magazine on October 13, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego

Time to swap the old book for a set of brass knuckles, published by PM Magazine on December 30, 1941, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego
See more on the project site, then graduate to the more subtle, complex political propaganda in Seuss’s children’s books with Tales for Little Rebels: A Collection of Radical Children’s Literature.
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Wednesday, August 8, 2012

A Google Maps Tour of Famous Authors’ Homes


PUBLISHED IN FLAVORWIRE

COURTESY OF Claire Cottrell


A Google Maps Tour of Famous Authors’ Homes



Awhile back we took a virtual tour of Old Hollywood film locations from last year’s Best Picture-winner, The Artist. Because there’s nothing we love more than virtual globetrotting and literary legends, we thought we’d take a gander at some of the more notable places that our favorite authors have lived. Hey, why not? From Joan Didion’s sprawling sun drenched estate that was her beloved Quintana Roo’s first home to the narrow passage where Ernest Hemingway lived while writing his ode to Paris, click through to check out Google’s rendition of significant literary locations around the world.


Ernest Hemingway’s apartment at 113 Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs — Paris France
Image credit: Google Maps
Sadly the little apartment Hemingway shared with his first wife, Hadley, and their son Bumby is long gone. However, according to an American blogger living in Paris, a secret passage from the expat heyday is still there. Hemingway describes the shortcut in A Moveable Feast, by writing that he walked out of his apartment and often cut into the back door of a boulangerie as a shortcut up to the main drag – Blvd. Montparnasse. Fun fact: As an homage to the literary legend, someone painted an image of Hemingway on the back door of the boulangerie that you can still see today.







Joan Didion’s Gatehouse at 5500 Palos Verdes Drive South — Rancho Palos Verdes, California
Image credit: Google Maps
In The Year of Magical Thinking, Joan Didion describes the home where she and her husband, John Dunne, lived briefly by writing, “One day I would notice a familiar stretch of coastal highway in a television commercial and realize it was the gate house, on the Palos Verdes Peninsula at Portuguese Bend, to which John and I had brought Quintana home from St. John’s Hospital. Neither the house nor its gate could be seen in the commercial but I experienced a sudden rush of memories: getting out of the car on that highway to open the gate so that John could drive through; watching the tide come in and float a car that was sitting on our beach to be shot for a commercial; sterilizing bottles for Quintana’s formula while the gamecock that lived on the property followed me companionably from window to window.”







William Burroughs’ ‘Bunker’ at 222 Bowery — New York, New York
Image credit: Google Maps
After years of living in Paris and London, Burroughs returned to New York City in 1974 and shared an apartment with the painter, Mark Rothko. Dubbed ‘The Bunker,’ it was then a partially converted YMCA, complete with lockers and communal showers. Just down the street from the New Museum, the ground floor now houses Green Depot, the nation’s leading supplier of environmentally friendly building products, services and home solutions.

Patti Smith’s Chelsea Hotel apartment at 222 West 23rd Street – New York, New York
Image credit: Google Maps
OK, so pretty much everyone lived, and some still live, at New York’s first co-op apartment building turned artist’s hotel, but our favorite one-time resident has to be the one-and-only Patti Smith, who lived here with her then lover and lifelong friend, Robert Mapplethorpe. Other artists passing through included: Mark Twain, Dylan Thomas, Thomas Wolfe, Tennessee Williams, Leonard Cohen, Arthur Miller, William Burroughs, Jackson Pollock, Donald Sutherland, Christo, Arthur C. Clarke, Andy Warhol, Jane Fonda, and Bob Dylan.







E.E. Cummings’ three-room studio at 11 Christopher Street — New York, New York
Image credit: Google Maps
E.E. Cummings apparently described the tiny West Village apartment that he lived in briefly as “the best studio in New York.” He paid $30 dollars a month for three furnished rooms with tall windows.
Jack Kerouac’s girlfriend’s courtyard apartment at 307 West 11th Street — New York, New York
Image credit: Google Maps
Kerouac crashed with his girlfriend at the time, Helen Weaver, at this gorgeous courtyard apartment. While he was there he revised On the Road and wrote part of Desolation Angels , which mentions this building and its “Dickensian windows.” Fun fact: Photographer Annie Liebowitz now owns it.
John Steinbeck’s fish hatchery home at 2400 Lake Forest Road — Sunnyside-Tahoe City, California
Image credit: Google Maps
John Steinbeck lived at what is today the Tahoe City Field Station, working as a caretaker at the fish hatchery. He lived in a little wooden cottage behind the main building after dropping out of Standford to write his first novel, Cup of Gold, a swashbuckling Caribbean pirate romance. Story has it that he got himself fired from the hatchery for womanizing and shooting holes in the ceiling of the tiny abode.
Mark Twain’s childhood home at 120 North Main Street — Hannibal, Missouri
Image credit: Google Maps
Mark Twain’s childhood home on the west bank of the Mississippi River is now the Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum. He lived here from 1844 to 1853, and found inspiration for many of his stories in and around Hannibal’s quaint Main Street. Fun fact: Tom Sawyer’s legendary white picket fence encloses the humble home’s property. You can see it in the foreground of the Google Street View.
William Shakespeare’s parish residence at Great St Helen’s — London, England
Image credit: Google Maps
The old stone parish was the first place Shakespeare lived in London. Today it sits in the shadow of Norman Foster’s giant glass Gherkin.
Fyodor Dostoevsky’s apartment at 5/2 Kuznechny Lane — St. Petersburg, Russia
Image credit: Google Maps
The former apartment of the famous writer is now the F. M. Dostoevsky Literary Memorial Museum. Although he didn’t live here his entire life, he did write two of his most notable works while living in the building, The Double: A Petersburg Poem and his last novel, The Brothers Karamazov which he finished shortly before his death in 1881.


Thank you for reading this article. I hope you found it interesting. 

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